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NEW comapny registration

Querist : Anonymous (Querist) 26 July 2011 This query is : Resolved 
Dear All
Me and my friend is going to start a recruitment consultancy. What is the procedure to register that company
A V Vishal (Expert) 26 July 2011
What is the company going to be a partnership firm, LLP or a company registered under the companies act? Information can be given if you state your option.
Querist : Anonymous (Querist) 26 July 2011
I dont know about LLP,
If you dont mine, Pls explain in all the above cases what is the procedure
A V Vishal (Expert) 27 July 2011
Partnership is defined as a relation between two or more persons who have agreed to share the profits of a business carried on by all of them or any of them acting for all. The owners of a partnership business are individually known as the "partners" and collectively as a "firm". Its main features are :-

A partnership is easy to form as no cumbersome legal formalities are involved. Its registration is also not essential. However, if the firm is not registered, it will be deprived of certain legal benefits. The Registrar of Firms is responsible for registering partnership firms.

The minimum number of partners must be two, while the maximum number can be 10 in case of banking business and 20 in all other types of business.

The firm has no separate legal existence of its own i.e., the firm and the partners are one and the same in the eyes of law.

In the absence of any agreement to the contrary, all partners have a right to participate in the activities of the business.

Ownership of property usually carries with it the right of management. Every partner, therefore, has a right to share in the management of the business firm.

Liability of the partners is unlimited. Legally, the partners are said to be jointly and severally liable for the liabilities of the firm. This means that if the assets and property of the firm is insufficient to meet the debts of the firm, the creditors can recover their loans from the personal property of the individual partners.

Restrictions are there on the transfer of interest i.e. none of the partners can transfer his interest in the firm to any person(except to the existing partners) without the unanimous consent of all other partners.

The firm has a limited span of life i.e. legally, the firm must be dissolved on the retirement, lunacy, bankruptcy, or death of any partner.

A partnership is formed by an agreement, which may be either written or oral. When the written agreement is duly stamped and registered, it is known as "Partnership Deed". Ordinarily, the rights, duties and liabilities of partners are laid down in the deed. But in the case where the deed does not specify the rights and obligations, the provisions of the THE INDIAN PARTNERSHIP ACT, 1932 will apply. The deed, generally contains the following particulars:-

Name of the firm.

Nature of the business to be carried out.

Names of the partners.

The town and the place where business will be carried on.

The amount of capital to be contributed by each partner.

Loans and advances by partners and the interest payable on them.

The amount of drawings by each partner and the rate of interest allowed thereon.

Duties and powers of each partner.

Any other terms and conditions to run the business.

Advantages

Ease of formation

Greater capital and credit resources

Better judgement and more managerial abilities

Disadvantages

Absence of ultimate authority

Liability for the actions of other partners

Limited life

Unlimited liability

Partnership is an appropriate form of ownership for medium sized business involving limited capital. This may include small scale industries, wholesale and retail trade; small service concerns like transport agencies, real estate brokers; professional firms like charted accountants, doctors' clinic, attorney or law firms etc.
A V Vishal (Expert) 27 July 2011
Limited Liability Partnership (LLP) is a new corporate structure that combines the flexibility of a partnership and the advantages of limited liability of a company at a low compliance cost. In other words, it is an alternative corporate business vehicle that provides the benefits of limited liability of a company, but allows its members the flexibility of organising their internal management on the basis of a mutually arrived agreement, as is the case in a partnership firm.

Owing to flexibility in its structure and operation, it would be useful for small and medium enterprises, in general, and for the enterprises in services sector, in particular. Internationally, LLPs are the preferred vehicle of business, particularly for service industry or for activities involving professionals.

LLP is governed by the provisions of the Limited Liability Partnership Act 2008, the salient features of which are as follows: -

The LLP shall be a body corporate and a legal entity separate from its partners. Any two or more persons, associated for carrying on a lawful business with a view to profit, may by subscribing their names to an incorporation document and filing the same with the Registrar, form a Limited Liability Partnership. The LLP will have perpetual succession.

The mutual rights and duties of partners of an LLP inter se and those of the LLP and its partners shall be governed by an agreement between partners or between the LLP and the partners subject to the provisions of the LLP Act 2008 . The act provides flexibility to devise the agreement as per their choice.

The LLP will be a separate legal entity, liable to the full extent of its assets, with the liability of the partners being limited to their agreed contribution in the LLP which may be of tangible or intangible nature or both tangible and intangible in nature. No partner would be liable on account of the independent or un-authorized actions of other partners or their misconduct. The liabilities of the LLP and partners who are found to have acted with intent to defraud creditors or for any fraudulent purpose shall be unlimited for all or any of the debts or other liabilities of the LLP.

Every LLP shall have at least two partners and shall also have at least two individuals as Designated Partners, of whom at least one shall be resident in India. The duties and obligations of Designated Partners shall be as provided in the law.

The LLP shall be under an obligation to maintain annual accounts reflecting true and fair view of its state of affairs. A statement of accounts and solvency shall be filed by every LLP with the Registrar every year. The accounts of LLPs shall also be audited, subject to any class of LLPs being exempted from this requirement by the Central Government.

The Central Government has powers to investigate the affairs of an LLP, if required, by appointment of competent Inspector for the purpose.

The compromise or arrangement including merger and amalgamation of LLPs shall be in accordance with the provisions of the LLP Act 2008.

A firm, private company or an unlisted public company is allowed to be converted into LLP in accordance with the provisions of the Act. Upon such conversion, on and from the date of certificate of registration issued by the Registrar in this regard, the effects of the conversion shall be such as are specified in the LLP Act. On and from the date of registration specified in the certificate of registration, all tangible (moveable or immoveable) and intangible property vested in the firm or the company, all assets, interests, rights, privileges, liabilities, obligations relating to the firm or the company, and the whole of the undertaking of the firm or the company, shall be transferred to and shall vest in the LLP without further assurance, act or deed and the firm or the company, shall be deemed to be dissolved and removed from the records of the Registrar of Firms or Registrar of Companies, as the case may be.

The winding up of the LLP may be either voluntary or by the Tribunal to be established under the Companies Act, 1956. Till the Tribunal is established, the power in this regard has been given to the High Court.

The LLP Act 2008 confers powers on the Central Government to apply provisions of the Companies Act, 1956 as appropriate, by notification with such changes or modifications as deemed necessary. However, such notifications shall be laid in draft before each House of Parliament for a total period of 30 days and shall be subject to any modification as may be approved by both Houses.

The Indian Partnership Act, 1932 shall not be applicable to Limited Liability Partnerships.
A V Vishal (Expert) 27 July 2011
A private limited company is a voluntary association of not less than two and not more than fifty members, whose liability is limited, the transfer of whose shares is limited to its members and who is not allowed to invite the general public to subscribe to its shares or debentures. Its main features are :-

It has an independent legal existence. The Indian Companies Act,1956 contains the provisions regarding the legal formalities for setting up of a private limited company. Registrars of Companies (ROC) appointed under the Companies Act covering the various States and Union Territories are vested with the primary duty of registering companies floated in the respective states and the Union Territories.

It is relatively less cumbersome to organise and operate it as it has been exempted from many regulations and restrictions to which a public limited company is subjected to. Some of them are :-

it need not file a prospectus with the Registrar.

it need not obtain the Certificate for Commencement of business.

it need not hold the statutory general meeting nor need it file the statutory report.

restrictions placed on the directors of the public limited company do not apply to its directors.


The liability of its members is limited.

The shares allotted to it's members are also not freely transferable between them. These companies are not allowed to invite public to subscribe to its shares and debentures.

It enjoys continuity of existence i.e. it continues to exist even if all its members die or desert it.

Hence, a private company is preferred by those who wish to take the advantage of limited liability but at the same time desire to keep control over the business within a limited circle and maintain the privacy of their business.

Advantages

Continuity of existence

Limited liability

Less legal restrictions

Disadvantages

Shares are not freely transferable

Not allowed to invite public to subscribe to its shares

Scope for promotional frauds

Undemocratic control

A V Vishal (Expert) 27 July 2011
A public limited company is a voluntary association of members which is incorporated and, therefore has a separate legal existence and the liability of whose members is limited. Its main features are :-

The company has a separate legal existence apart from its members who compose it.

Its formation, working and its winding up, in fact, all its activities are strictly governed by laws, rules and regulations. The Indian Companies Act, 1956 contains the provisions regarding the legal formalities for setting up of a public limited company. Registrars of Companies (ROC) appointed under the Companies Act covering the various States and Union Territories are vested with the primary duty of registering companies floated in the respective states and the Union Territories.

A company must have a minimum of seven members but there is no limit as regards the maximum number.

The company collects its capital by the sale of its shares and those who buy the shares are called the members. The amount so collected is called the share capital.

The shares of a company are freely transferable and that too without the prior consent of other shareholders or without subsequent notice to the company.

The liability of a member of a company is limited to the face value of the shares he owns. Once he has paid the whole of the face value, he has no obligation to contribute anything to pay off the creditors of the company.

The shareholders of a company do not have the right to participate in the day-to-day management of the business of a company. This ensures separation of ownership from management. The power of decision making in a company is vested in the Board of Directors, and all policy decisions are taken at the Board level by the majority rule. This ensures a unity of direction in management.

As a company is an independent legal person, its existence is not affected by the death, retirement or insolvency of any of its shareholders.

Advantages

Continuity of existence

Larger amount of capital

Unity of direction

Efficient management

Limited liability

Disadvantages

Scope for promotional frauds

Undemocratic control

Scope for directors for personal profit

Subjected to strict regulations



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