cpc

congress's web of deceit

Adv P & H High Court Chandigarh

Congress spokesman Abhishek Manu Singhvi cannot be faulted for asserting that "the Prime Minister of India does not deal with what every police constable does". The two jobs — that of the Prime Minister and a police constable — are not comparable by any stretch of the imagination, nor are the responsibilities vested in either similar in nature. What Mr Singhvi has iterated is a truism that would be questioned by only the intellectually challenged and hence need not have been stated in the first place, unless, of course, like many others in the Congress he believes that the people of India lack rudimentary intelligence. Such smug arrogance and self-righteousness, however, do not serve to hide a simple fact: Mr Singhvi, like his colleague who had the gall to suggest that questioning Rajiv Gandhi's role in la affaire Warren Anderson, the chairman of Union Carbide Corporation when the world's worst industrial disaster occurred at the firm's pesticides factory in Bhopal, is tantamount to being "unpatriotic", is desperate to prevent the truth about the unseemly episode from becoming common knowledge. This could be either because as a loyal foot soldier of the party he feels it is his bounden duty to save the Congress's first family from public scrutiny and rebuke, or the reason Warren Anderson was assured and given safe passage 26 years ago — American pressure — is as valid today as it was then. It would not be entirely incorrect to suggest Mr Singhvi, who said what he did while denouncing former Foreign Secretary MK Rasgotra for disclosing that Rajiv Gandhi was informed about the assurance given to the American Embassy that Warren Anderson would not be harassed or arrested during his visit to India and had approved of the decision, was being a loyal Congress worker as well as mindful of not compromising American interests, more specifically the interests of multinational corporations.


Yet, all this skulduggery and crude subterfuge is so unnecessary. Let us presume, and there is sufficient evidence to do so, that Rajiv Gandhi knew and approved of the decision to give safe passage to Warren Anderson (of which police constables would definitely not have been aware) because of which he was never brought to trial for a horrendous crime. Would it not make eminent sense for the Government — and the Congress — to admit this upfront? Those in denial mode could have instead said: At that point of time this seemed the right decision; in retrospect it turned out to be an error of judgement. This would have been both graceful and helpful in bringing about a closure to the Bhopal tragedy which the survivors, more than anybody else, deserve to get on with their lives. It would also be the starting point for looking afresh at what more could be done to alleviate the sufferings of those who lived through that night of horror, try to ensure the guilty are brought to book, and such disasters do not occur ever again. Instead, we have the Congress spinning a web of deceit and churning out lies; this honours neither the memory of their departed leader whom they seek to protect nor the memories of the thousands who perished on the night of December 2-3, 1984. More importantly, it inflicts enormous damage on the nation: The world cannot be expected to respect a country, irrespective of its GDP, whose Government is dominated by a party which has no respect for the truth, that too when it involves the lives of its own citizens.

 

 
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Student

Raj, Why don't you call Mr.Sanghvi (and if possible Mr.Harish Salve - as Umpire) for the political slugfest. I can't understand the motive, reasoning and making pointed comments for sake of ???????????????????????? Best Regards Daksh
 
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Student

Raj, One should learn to seek the things in right earnest/perspective as admittedly. Emotion is defined as a mental state having to do with the arousal of strong feelings such as love, fear or anger. Intellect is the ability to learn and reason and the capacity for knowledge and understanding. Knowledge and experience are key factors in shaping one's intelligence. Best Regards Daksh
 
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Student

Raj, One more addition!!!!!! Let us first accept that emotions will always be there. They have an invaluable role in our lives. But they should be tempered with intelligence as and when required. One should gather as much knowledge as possible and apply it. In short, one should weigh all emotions against the call of our intellect before taking any decision. What would be the result of such an exercise? Our lives will move in a steady upward curve, without violent ups and downs. Now, isn't that what we really want? Best Regard Daksh
 
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Student

Raj, Let's put the record sake - for last upteen mails I always have the last laugh/word - let's see this time as well. Best Regards Daksh
 
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