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Radhey (Owner)     07 January 2012

Hc suggested a man mad because he recorded court proceeding

 

The Delhi high court has sent a businessman to two weeks of mental treatment on Wednesday for recording court proceedings in his mini tape recorder.

 

 

 

 

 

Justice Suresh Kait said Deepak Khosla, who is fighting 20 cases in courts, "needed check up" at Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences (IHBAS), saying he had been continuously disrespecting the court orders telling him not to record proceedings.

 

 

 

The judge, who had seized the tape recorder on December 23, had told Khosla to appear before him on Wednesday. Terming the order "absurd" and an "affront on campaign for greater transparency in working of judiciary", his lawyer Prashant Bhushan said an appeal will be filed.

Bhushan said he will argue Khosla's review petition against an order of the court of August 2011. The then chief justice's bench had dismissed Khosla's plea for permitting lawyers and litigants to audio and video record court proceedings in high court and subordinate courts.

"An effort has been made to give sermon in the name of transparency. An individual sermon cannot attain status of law…such a direction cannot be issued in the absence of legislative enactment," chief justice Dipak Misra and justice Sanjiv Khanna had said adding Khosla, a businessman did not have a "legal right" in this regard.

Interestingly, while referring Khosla's plea to the chief justice's bench, justice SN Dhingra of the court (now retired) had said on February 28 last year that the "step will also be deterrent against judges who do not come to courts on time as then there will be evidence against in this regard in the form of CDs and cassettes".

On April 8, 2010, Khosla had succeeded in taping at least 100 minutes of hearing of his case before the judges ordered seizure of the recorder.

https://www.hindustantimes.com/India-news/NewDelhi/Man-sent-to-mental-institute-for-recording-court-proceedings/Article1-791341.aspx

I think that this judge of HC has sent this brave/wise man to the Mad house just to make him a vegetable/mad, what wrong he has done, he has just recorded the Court Proceeding, why the Judge became so angry .

Why in the first place it is not allowed to record Court's proceeding, Only because the judges are afraid that there dishonest and Foolish faces will be disclosed to one and all. 

This Man is not that who need mental treatment, it is this judge and our judicial system that need treatment.

Please contribute....







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 15 Replies

Arup (UNEMPLOYED)     07 January 2012

" Justice Suresh Kait said Deepak Khosla, who is fighting 20 cases in courts, "needed check up" at Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences (IHBAS), saying he had been continuously disrespecting the court orders telling him not to record proceedings."

- if it is open court, one, very perticularly, the person who is party of  the case has the full right to record it's proceedings. as a courtse he may pray for the same, and in case of refusal one should go to higher court against this proceeding.

 

IF THE COURT IS IN CAMERA, perties may be deprived from the above facility.

 

it seems that

"Only because the judges are afraid that there dishonest and Foolish faces will be disclosed to one and all."

"  
I think that the bellow reason is perfect:-

"it is this judge and our judicial system that need treatment."

Narendra Sharma (Consultant)     08 January 2012

 

TRANSCRIPTS AND RECORDINGS OF ORAL ARGUMENTS
(October 2008)
Beginning with the October 2006 Term, the Court will make the transcriptts of oral
arguments available free to the public on its Website, www.supremecourtus.gov, on the same
day an argument is heard by the Court.
The Court’s contracted reporting service, Alderson Reporting Company1, with the aid of
a court reporter in the Courtroom and high-speed technology, will transcribe the oral arguments
more quickly, therefore, providing the transcriptts to the Court for same day posting on our
website.
Transcriptts will be listed by case name and the date of oral argument. Transcriptts are
permanently archived beginning with the 2000 Term on the Court’s Website. Transcriptts prior to
the 2000 Term are maintained in the Supreme Court Library.
After Alderson completes an oral argument transcriptt and provides copies to the Court it
is sent to Westlaw and added to their collection. Westlaw’s collection includes oral argument
transcriptts since 1990, which subscribers can access through the SCT-ORALARG database2.
Such oral argument transcriptts are also available on the Lexis-Nexis service. Lexis-Nexis'
collection includes all oral argument transcriptts since the beginning of the October 1979 Term.
Subscribers to Lexis-Nexis (with a software package) can access these documents by entering the
GENFED library and then clicking on the USTRAN file, which allows for a case name, docket or
date range search for transcriptts3.
Alderson Reporting Company also delivers copies of oral argument transcriptts to the
Supreme Court Library where they are added to the Library’s records and briefs collection and
are available to the public after 3:00 p.m. the next business day4. The Library’s collection
1 To order a transcriptt from the contractor, contact Alderson Reporting Company, Inc., Attn: Transcriptt Order,
1111 14th Street, NW, 4th Floor, Washington, DC 20005-5650. An Alderson Company representative can be
reached by phone at (202) 289-2260 or (800) 367-3376, fax at (202) 289-2221 or (800) 367-3310 or e-mail at
www.info@aldersonreporting.com. Transcriptts can also be ordered through Alderson’s website at
www.aldersonreporting.com (to purchase, click “Order Supreme Court Transcriptts”).
2 Westlaw can be reached by phone at (800) 328-4880, or through its website at https://www.westlaw.com/.
3 Lexis-Nexis can be reached by phone at (800) 356-6548 (Lexis Sales) or (800) 843-6476, or through its website
https://www.lexis-nexis.com/.
4 The Supreme Court website is at https://www.supremecourtus.gov (click on "Oral Arguments" and click on
"Argument Transcriptts").
contains the transcriptts of every oral argument since the beginning of the 1968 Term and a
random selection of transcriptts from oral arguments before the 1968 Term dating back to 1935.
Photocopies cost ten cents per page. In addition to its oral argument transcriptts, the Library’s
collection includes records and briefs from 1832 to the present.5
The Court also makes its own set of oral argument recordings. This set of recordings is
kept in the Marshal’s Office for the remainder of the Term, during which time it is not available
to the general public. At the beginning of the next Term, the recordings are transmitted from the
Marshal to the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch of the National Archives. The
Archives’ collection contains audio recordings of Supreme Court oral arguments from 1955
through the immediately preceding October Term. Members of the public can listen to or make
their own copies of oral argument recordings using their own tape recorders, blank tapes, and
patch cords at the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch. Copies of recordings can also be
purchased from the Archives.6 To listen to or purchase a copy of a recording, the Archives asks
that individuals requesting recordings provide the case title, Supreme Court case number, and
date of the oral argument. Although no formal appointment is required to listen to recordings,
the Archives recommends that individuals interested in retrieving copies make sure the Archives
has a “reference copy” of the particular argument they are looking for prior to visiting the
Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch.
Many recordings of oral arguments are also available on the Oyez Project website created
and maintained by Professor Jerry Goldman of Northwestern University.7 This website allows
access to approximately 588 cases through the use of the RealNetwork’s RealPlayer. The cases
cover a wide range of time periods and areas of constitutional law and are digitized from actual
copies of the official argument tapes held by the National Archives. To access arguments
through the website, click on “Cases” on the homepage to search by title, citation, subject, or
date. The website offers new audio materials from a Term approximately 10 months after the
end of that Term.
Many Supreme Court oral argument recordings and/or transcriptts are also available in
published collections that can be purchased. The multi-volume set, Landmark Briefs and
Arguments of the Supreme Court of the United States: Constitutional Law, edited by Professors
Gerald Gunther and Gerhard Casper, contains oral argument transcriptts and all written briefs
submitted to the Court (including amicus curiae briefs) for major cases in constitutional law that
are considered “landmark” cases by the editors. Purchases must be made by volume (not by
5
The United States Supreme Court Library can be reached by phone at (202) 479-3186.
6
To obtain recordings of Supreme Court oral arguments through the National Archives contact the National
Archives Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch, National Archives at College Park, Room 3340, 8601 Adelphi
Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001. The Branch can be reached by phone at (301) 837-3540 or by fax at
(301) 837-3620. The website is located at:
https://www.archives.gov/research_room/media_formats/film_sound_video.html
7
The address for the Oyez Project website is https://oyez.nwu.edu/.
individual case) and each volume is hardbound and approximately 750 pages.8 This set is also
available at various law libraries.
Another collection of oral arguments is The Supreme Court’s Greatest Hits. This multimedia
CD-ROM program currently costs $29.95 and comprises oral arguments (taped and
digitally encoded directly from the Archives’ official recordings), texts, and images. The
program, edited by Professor Jerry Goldman, creator of the Oyez Project, includes fifty cases, six
related cases that were argued separately but decided with a principal case, and thirteen opinion
pronouncements.9
Oral argument collections are also available on microfiche. The Congressional
Information Service (CIS) produces a microfiche collection called Oral Arguments of the U. S.
Supreme Court. This collection includes oral argument transcriptts from the 1953 Term to the
present and can be purchased from CIS, which sells microfiches only by Term (not by individual
argument).10 The collection can also be found at various law libraries.
APPENDIX TO TRANSCRIPTS AND RECORDINGS
OF ORAL ARGUMENTS
PRINTED TRANSCRIPTS:
Alderson Reporting Company, Inc.
Attn: Transcriptt Order
1111 14th Street, NW, 4th Floor
Washington, DC 20005-5650
Phone: (202) 289-2260 or (800) 367-3376
Fax: (202) 289-2221or (800) 367-3310
Website: www.aldersonreporting.com (to purchase, click “Order Supreme Court Transcriptts”)
E-mail: www.info@aldersonreporting.com
The National Archives (Old Military and Civil Branch)
8
For more information about this publication, contact the Congressional Information Service, 4520 East-West
Highway, Bethesda, MD 20814-3389. It can be reached by phone at (301) 654-1550 or (800) 638-8380, or by fax at
(301) 657-3203. The website is located at https://www.cis.pubs.com/.
9
To order The Supreme Court’s Greatest Hits, contact the Association of American University Presses, 71 West
23rd Street, Suite #901, New York, NY 10010. The Association can by reached by phone at (212) 989-1010 or by
fax at (212) 989-0275. The website is located at https://aaup.uchicago.edu/. For more information about the
collection, see the following website: https://nupress.nwu.edu/scgh/.
10
For more information about the microfiche collection, contact the Congressional Information Service. See
footnote 8, supra.
National Archives Records and Administration
7th Street and Pennsylvania Avenues, NW
Washington, DC 20408
Phone: (202) 501-5395
Fax: (202) 219-6273
E-mail: NWCTB@nara.gov
United States Supreme Court Library
One First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20543
Phone (202) 479-3186
Website: www.supremecourtus.gov
ELECTRONIC TRANSCRIPTS:
Westlaw
Phone: (800) 328-4880
Website: https://www.westlaw.com/
Lexis-Nexis
Phone: (800) 356-6548 (Lexis sales)
(800) 843-6476
Website: https://www.lexis-nexis.com/
U.S. Supreme Court
Website: https://www.supremecourtus.gov
Click on "Oral Arguments"
Click on "Argument Transcriptts"
ORAL ARGUMENT RECORDINGS:
National Archives
Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Branch
National Archives at College Park
Room 3340
8601 Adelphi Road
College Park, MD 20740-6001
Phone: (301) 837-3540
Fax: (301) 837-3620
Website: https://www.archives.gov/research_room/media_formats/film_sound_video.html
The Oyez Project (Northwestern University) -- Unofficial
Website: https://oyez.nwu.edu/
COLLECTIONS OF ORAL ARGUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE:
Landmark Briefs and Arguments of the Supreme Court of the United States: Constitutional Law
Lexis-Nexis
4520 East-West Highway
Bethesda, MD 20814-3389
Phone: (301) 654-1550 or (800) 638-8380
Fax: (301) 657-3203
Website: https://www.cis.pubs.com/
The Supreme Court's Greatest Hits
The Association of American University Presses
71 West 23rd Street, Suite # 901
New York, NY 10010
Phone: (212) 989-1010
Fax: (212) 989-0275
Website: https://aaup.uchicago.edu/
E-mail: https://nupress@nwu.edu
MICROFILM/MICROFICHE
Oral Arguments of the U.S. Supreme Court
Lexis-Nexis
4520 East-West Highway
Bethesda, MD 20814-3389
Phone: (301) 654-1550 or (800) 638-8380
Fax: (301) 657-3203

Attached File : 130402293 1-1-transcript & recording of oral arguments-availabilityoforalargumenttranscripts.pdf downloaded: 64 times

Radhey (Owner)     08 January 2012

Narender JI, Can you please describe the central point of your post?

If you mean to say that there is some provision of recording the verbal argumentation or proceedings of Courts in writitngs by Court Staff then certainly I do know that it is not done in each and every Court case and it will never serve the purpose, what a clear video recording of  the Court proceedings can serve, moreover such recordings should be availabe for one and all on demand on reasonable payment.

Narendra Sharma (Consultant)     08 January 2012

The central point of my post is that recording of ORAL Court Proceedings is in vogue in USA since 1935, hence there should be no hesitation in our country.

Radhey (Owner)     08 January 2012

Narender Ji, By recording do you mean --VDO recording ???

Narendra Sharma (Consultant)     09 January 2012

Yes, by recording I mean --preferably VDO recording and --to start with at least Audio recording.

Anil Agrawal (Retired)     10 January 2012

Parliament proceedings are recorded and telecast. Why this hesitation in judiciary?

1 Like

Radhey (Owner)     11 January 2012

Narender Ji You said,"Yes, by recording I mean --preferably VDO recording and --to start with at least Audio recording."


That means you have said the same thing which I am saying and in other words you are supporting the idea that this Judge who has sent a man to Mental House just because he was recording Court proceeeding and was in support of recording Court proceeding , is wrong.


Thanks for your sharing.

Arup (UNEMPLOYED)     11 January 2012

yes mr agrwal,

namaste, very right you are.

Anil Agrawal (Retired)     11 January 2012

Don't say a word about judiciary. 

Radhey (Owner)     11 January 2012

Mr. Anil, that is something again Very wrong.The judiciary should also be opened to one and all, they are not Gods.


Judicial Accountability Bill......And you say ," Do not say a word about Judiciary"


Ha!


Ha!

Radhey (Owner)     11 January 2012

Though I condemn  "Ish Ninda" type  Law of Pakistan.

Anil Agrawal (Retired)     11 January 2012

I was misunderstood when I said don't say a word about judiciary.

Please try to understand the subtle meaning.

Radhey (Owner)     12 January 2012

Mr Anil, it is understood , Thnx.


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