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Justacommonman (Common)     25 September 2013

Crpc 125 with exaggerated claims

My wife filed CrPC 125 case against me in MM court with exaggerated claims of my income (about 4-5 times of my income). 

She

  1. Is more qualified than me? Post Grad (Her) vs Grad (Myself)
  2. Left her job sometimes back telling me that she would take up something else later. I have records of her prior job and salary details
  3. Deserted me one fine day without any rhyme or reason.

What's my best possible way to fight considering that

  • Can I ask court to direct her to provide proof of what claims she has made or admit that she made false complaint?
  • She has deserted without any just cause and she has admitted the same via SMS
  • I have proof to show that I tried to bring her back but she denied.

Please suggest a good line of defence.

Also, Is this right time to file RCR. My appearance is in 2 days and do not have a lawyer yet as received notice very late.



Learning

 8 Replies


(Guest)
  • Can I ask court to direct her to provide proof of what claims she has made or admit that she made false complaint?

Opinion: Ask your lawyer to request the judge to appoint court commissioner to enquire all the income details of your wife,if you are restricted by something.

Use RTI if she is working in PSU or Govt. sector.

  • She has deserted without any just cause and she has admitted the same via SMS

Opinion: A deserted husband by wife without any reason is no ground to seek maintenance from husband.

Collect some more proof about her willful desertion.

  • I have proof to show that I tried to bring her back but she denied.

Opinion: That's gud,make that authenticated without any doubt, like make your calling and mending process via legal mode., which can't be rejected or kept aside during the evidence stage.

Please suggest a good line of defence.

 

Opinion: My bro....... A good line of defence alway's start's with offensive in nature....

Once you will counter her claims with patience and happiness and boldness in your effort's the moment she will realize that she has done a big mistake for filling false cases as you are not feared and got Backfooted whereas you stood to fight with more zeal and enthuthiasm.

 

Also, Is this right time to file RCR. My appearance is in 2 days and do not have a lawyer yet as received notice very late.

 

Opinion: If you realy want her to know that you are calling her then it's good time to file RCR support with proof of your effort's to call her back.

But alway's remember RCR is only a testimonial for you that you are good husband and you wanted to coahbit with her,but it was she who dumped you.

And nothing more than that........No court can force her to join you. It can only save you in alimony cases if she never join's you even after the decree of RCR.

Samir N (General Queries) (Business)     26 September 2013

I would focus on the advise that @sufferer has offered that a wife who refuses to stay with her husband for no legitimate reasons disqualifies herself for any maintenance. 

Accordingly, focus on this defence. Write a response to her application citing some caselaws and there are many for the above argument or in the alternate, characterize the response as your application to dismiss her application on this ground. In the application state that only if it is not dismissed would you like to later address the merits of the quantum of maintenance sought but that at this time your position is that the amount sought is also outrageous.


ADVICE ON ADVOCATES SINCE YOU ARE GETTING STARTED.


ADVOCATES ARE MORONS. But you need them in the Court because they have experience in procedural matters and you look more serious with a lawyer around. Write your own application to dismiss her petition/application. Ask the advocate to review it. Do not ask the advocate to write one. He will screw it up!  Never sign on any filing that the advocate puts before you at the last minute. If during arguments, your advocate does not argue what you would like him to, do not hesitate to get up and seek permission from the Court to say a few words. You need to be prepared at all times to do this because advocates in India have a very low IQ or your adversary may have bribed him. The problem I hear from many litigants is that at some point, their own advocate becomes their bigger adversary than the real adversary. Why? Because they try to make money any which way they can! So, be careful and use your advocate like a dog. Only to bark in court. The intellectual planning, coming up with a strategy , etc. should be done by you. Do not pay him a big fee upfront. Throw small bones (small money) at him on a regular basis...like you would to a dog. Tell him that you are impressed by his intelligence. That, in particular, will help you to be in his good books because they are not used to such compliments. Never disclose your strategy to him because you can be sure that it will reach your wife. Just let him know the bare minimum that he needs to know but pretend that you trust him like your brother. If you want some information or some misinformation to reach your wife, tell that to your advocate with the request that it is very confidential and that he should not disclose it to anyone. Be assured the information will reach your wife!

AjayKumarSharma (Anon)     26 September 2013

@Sufferer

For the first point what I meant was that - She has made a false complaint by exaggerating my earning capacity. She says I earn X amount per month (say 5 Lakh) and thus she wants Y (say 3 Lakh). Can I ask the court to direct her to provide evidence to court as to the basis of her saying that I'm earning X amount per month and thus asking for inflated maintenance i.e. Y amount per month. It is obvious that she is lying because a normal private sector employee can only earn so much in this country. Wouldn't the court take notice of her lying in the original complaint.  I don't want to provide my earning details to the court until the court asks for it. I want her to prove the basis of my earning and if she can't prove that, then I would request to the court to punish her for making false complaint in court.

 

Also few more questions:

1. Any idea if I file RCR post my first hearing, would that do any good?

2. Can she also claim maintenance under sec 24 HMA if I file RCR?

3. If she is capable of earning but is not doing work because she wasnts to make merry on maintenance... could I ask the court to consider her previous salary as the basis for deciding maintenance?

4. Does the family condition of her parents has any bearing on the case? They are well off and have multiple properties etc. Could I ask court to appoint court commisioner to invetigate the claims that she made in the court that her parents are pauper and don't have any means to support her?

 

Appreciate all the response and help here. Looking forwrd to you r guidance.

 


(Guest)

@Sufferer

For the first point what I meant was that - She has made a false complaint by exaggerating my earning capacity. She says I earn X amount per month (say 5 Lakh) and thus she wants Y (say 3 Lakh). Can I ask the court to direct her to provide evidence to court as to the basis of her saying that I'm earning X amount per month and thus asking for inflated maintenance i.e. Y amount per month. It is obvious that she is lying because a normal private sector employee can only earn so much in this country. Wouldn't the court take notice of her lying in the original complaint.  I don't want to provide my earning details to the court until the court asks for it. I want her to prove the basis of my earning and if she can't prove that, then I would request to the court to punish her for making false complaint in court.

 

Opinion: If you want to save your ass then it's your homework to give all the proofs of your income,liabiliites,expenses,future liabilities,her source of income,her educational details,her qualificational details,her experience details etc.

This is not what you have thought,It's indian Judiciary where favour's are always praised for women,so in maintenance cases it's depend's on man that how smartly he gives his all details and her details to minimize the maintenance to her.

Anyhow she has to give the claim amount's clarification with solid proof which can't be ignored.But It's higly recommendable to you to do your part efficiently without relying on judge to ask her to give the proof and all,you make sure that before her submission of proof you are ahead of her if you realy want to save your hard earned money then,don't act liniently.

 

Also few more questions:

1. Any idea if I file RCR post my first hearing, would that do any good?

 

Opinion: A women can ask via 5 ways to claim maintenance,so it's not wiser to file RCR only for the sake of avoiding maintenence.

For RCR------As stated in my first post for you.

 

2. Can she also claim maintenance under sec 24 HMA if I file RCR?

 

Opinion: Yes offcourse, 24 HMA is a Maintnance claim during the pendancy of any cases Under HMA.

 

3. If she is capable of earning but is not doing work because she wasnts to make merry on maintenance... could I ask the court to consider her previous salary as the basis for deciding maintenance?

 

Opinion: Yes...........It's matter of arguement and proof to show cause her false claim on the account of fact's and circumstances.

 

 

4. Does the family condition of her parents has any bearing on the case? They are well off and have multiple properties etc. Could I ask court to appoint court commisioner to invetigate the claims that she made in the court that her parents are pauper and don't have any means to support her?

 

Opinion:  No it not depend's on her income until or unless any properties or assets are not named on her or she is not benefited by them.If you think that she is having income from them or any income could be derrived from them which she will be benfited then seek court interfrence.

 

Appreciate all the response and help here. Looking forwrd to you r guidance.

 

AjayKumarSharma (Anon)     26 September 2013

Thanks a lot bro

Is the decision for maintenance by court based on the income of husband or on the assets?

rajiv_lodha (zz)     27 September 2013

Delhi HC

Shakti Pershad vs Ratna Pershad on 31/1/2003
JUDGMENT
Mahmood Ali Khan, J.
1. In this civil revision petition filed under Section 115 of the CPC the petitioner Shakti Pershad, who is
husband, has assailed the order of an Additional District Judge dated 25.2.2001 whereby he has dismissed the
application filed by the petitioner under Section 24 of the Act but has allowed a similar application under
Section 24 filed by the respondent wife Ms. Ratna Pershad fixing her pendentelite maintenance at Rs. 12,000/-
per month besides awarding Rs. 10,000 as expenses of the proceedings in a divorce proceedings instituted by
the respondent wife.
2. Briefly stated the facts are that Ms. Ratna, respondent, has filed a petition for a decree of divorce against the
petitioner Shakti Pershad on the ground of cruelty under Clause (ia) of Section 13(1) of the Hindu Marriage
Act (the Act). She also filed an application for grant of her pendentilite maintenance and an amount for
meeting expenses of the proceeding. In the application she alleged that she does not own any movable or
immovable property and has no independent income to support her. She is financially dependent upon her
parents. Her jewellery was disposed of from time to time for meeting necessary expenses at the behest of the
petitioner husband. The petitioner husband belonged to one of the Delhi's richest families and was living an
affluent lifestyle. He was member of several clubs but he had no money for the respondent wife, who was a
mere housewife. She had to sell her jewellery to meet expenses on her bread and butter and expenses of her
son. Both she and the petitioner were divorcees. She had a daughter from her first marriage who was living
with her while the petitioner had two daughters from his first marriage but both of them were living with their
mother. After the marriage with the petitioner she had given birth to a son in 1984 who was living with her
and she had to bear expenses of his education also. The son is at present studying in 10th class in Vasant
Valley School and both she and the son are dependent upon his father. The petitioner was born in a wealthy
family. He had a house in a posh Friends Colony East and he was a member of Gymkhana Club, Noida golf
club and some other clubs. He owns ancestral property in Chandni Chowk, Delhi. Some of these properties
have been sold by him and he had received huge amount as sale consideration which is in his personal
knowledge and he should be directed to disclose it. He owns a two storeyed palatial house built over an area
of 1800 square feet bearing No. 45, Friends Colony East. His mother sold an annexe building built on 800
square yards of land for a consideration of over a crore. A part of the land in Friends Colony was also sold to
Unitech Builders for building flats and the petitioner has received his share from the huge consideration. She
alleged that she was spending about Rs. 2,80,000 on the maintenance and schooling of her son which is
roughly about Rs. 27,000 per month. This sum is being borrowed by her from her father. She has to repay
about Rs. 1.5 lakhs for the maintenance of her son since he was abandoned by the respondent on 23.3.1999.
She is not maintaining good health. Her medical expenses, food and boarding will amount to at least
Rs,25,000 monthly on a modest estimate. She tires easily and has to employ at least 2 female servants to nurse
and look after her. The petitioner had forced her into litigation and she needed minimum Rs. 50,000 in the
first instance to meet in and out of pocket expenses and charges. The court should direct the petitioner to pay
Rs. 25,000 per month for meeting the rent of the house for her in Delhi as a temporary measure since her
father would then be able to return back to Hyderabad and carry on his consultancy business there as before.
She claimed that she had been paid Rs. 60,000 for her and her son's maintenance and besides the petitioner
should also be directed to pay Rs. 25,000 per month as rent of the premises to be taken by her for her and her
son's residence. She also claimed Rs. 50,000 as expenses of the proceedings. Further more she wanted Rs. 1.5
lakhs to be given by the petitioner to enable her to return to her father who had incurred the expenses on her
and her son since they started living separately from the petitioner.
3. In the application which the petitioner Shakti Pershad filed it was alleged that after the marriage he had
been giving all his attention to the respondent and was spending huge sums of money on her maintenance and
treatment. He had provided best medical assistance to her. The respondent wife is a woman of substantial
means and has a regular source of income. She is driving a Honda City car, has credit cards, she is
maintaining a cellphone and she is living a luxurious and expensive life for which she is not dependent on
anybody. The son of the parties is staying with the petitioner and the respondent wife should be directed to
pay the expenses to him which she was claiming in her application for the upkeep and the education of the son
to him. The petitioner was an old man of 55 years and he is unable now to start a new business to sustain
himself and his son. He has only one property which he inherited from his father. It is built on 330 square
yards of land in New Friends Colony, East. The said property is mortgaged against a loan which was taken by
him from Bank of Punjab. The bank has obtained an order of injunction against the alienation of the said
house against him in the recovery proceeding before the Debt Recovery Tribunal. He himself and his son are
both financially dependent upon his mother who had inherited some wealth from his father. He himself does
not have any income since 1998. The industrial unit set up was closed down because of financial loses. Its
machinery was hypothecated in favor of the bank. No money has been paid to the bank against the
outstanding loan. Over the years his wealth has depleted, consequently, he is totally dependent on his mother.
He does not own any car or vehicle. He does not pay any tax He did not file income tax return. He had been
borrowing money from his friends and relatives. He became member of Gymkhana club 30 years back and
now he owned a sum of Rs. 6000 to the club which he is not able to pay. Similarly, he was indebted to Noida
Golf club and has stopped going to clubs. His residence telephone has also been closed due to non payment of
the telephone bill and the outgoing calls have been stopped. He is not in a position to pay the legal expenses.
His mother has taken upon herself to bear the educational expenses of his son. His monthly expenditure for
running the household which included himself and his son was Rs. 12,000. The monthly tuition fees of the son
was Rs. 3000. His son also needed Rs. 2500 per month which includes his private tuition, pocket money,
medical expenses, school uniform, stationary books, entertainment and other like expenses. Because of his
financial incapability he is forced to borrow this money from his mother and friends. He has to return the
money. It is also difficult for him to pursue the legal proceedings. Since the respondent wife is better of,
therefore, he has prayed that she should be directed to pay Rs. 12,000 per month as pendentilite maintenance
for running the household and Rs. 5500/- per month as interim maintenance for meeting the expenses of his
son etc.
4. The trial court after hearing the parties by the impugned order held that the petitioner husband has failed to
bring on record any evidence suggesting that the respondent wife has income and that she owned a car, a
cellphone or had a credit card. On the other hand upon consideration of the allegations made in the petition,
the written statement and the application and also the material placed on record he held that the petitioner
husband had income. He was spending lacs of rupees on providing medical assistance and surgery of the
respondent, he was providing Rs. 50,000 as household expenses to the respondent, he was providing all the
luxuries to her, he himself was a rich man. He owned property, he came from a very rich and affluent family
of Delhi. He had been selling the properties and was meeting all the expenses from which it could be inferred
that he had sufficient income. In the totality of the facts and circumstances he rejected the application of the
petitioner and allowed that of the respondent wife and fixing the pendentilite maintenance of the respondent
wife at Rs. 12,000 and also directed the petitioner to pay Rs. 10,000 to her for meeting the expenses of the
proceeding.
5. The petitioner is aggrieved and has filed the present petition.
6. I have heard the counsel for the parties and have gone through the record.
7. Counsel for the petitioner has strenuously canvassed that in the divorce petition the respondent herself had
averred that the petitioner was not earning since 1994 and that he was disposing of the property for running
the household. It is submitted that the respondent has further admitted in the divorce petition that the
petitioner had set up a factory in 1993 borrowing money from the bank of Punjab which was closed down and
the bank had filed proceedings for recovery of money before the Debt Recovery Tribunal. She had admitted
that she was the guarantor to that loan. She also argued that the petitioner, though member of Gymkhana club
became its member 30 years back and now he owed Rs. 6000 to it which he is not able to pay. He has stopped
going to Noida golf club because he could not bear the expenses. He does not own a car, cellphone or credit
card. He also stated that he does have a dog in his house. But he is now totally dependent upon his mother
who had inherited some wealth from his father who died in 1989. Counsel for the petitioner also argued that
interim maintenance could be paid to the husband and wife under Section 24 of the Act having regard to the
income of both the spouses. It is urged in the instant case that it is the respondent's own case that the petitioner
has no earning at all and that he is disposing of his property to meet the expenses and if it is so the petitioner
husband could not be said to have "income" out of which he may be required to pay the pendentilite
maintenance to the respondent. Moreover it is argued by her that the maintenance is payable to the wife under
Section 24 of the Act only when she does not have independent income to support her. It is contended that the
respondent is leading a luxurious life. She owns a Honda City car, a cellphone, credit cards and she is
spending lavishly and therefore, her contention that she does not have income is false.
8. Controverting the above arguments of counsel for the petitioner counsel for the respondent stated that the
respondent had no independent income. She is entirely dependent upon her father who is living in a rented
flat. It is submitted that the petitioner has not placed on record any evidence or other material to show that his
household expenses and the expenses of the child are being born of petitioner's mother. According to him the
respondent is maintaining a palatial house, running the household, maintaining a dog, emjoying membership
of clubs etc and he could not have done it with no income accruing to him from any source. It was contended
that the petitioner who belonged to one of the richest business family of Delhi owned properties which he was
selling. He got money from the sale of land. He also got money when his mother sold annexe house for over a
crore of rupees. It is, therefore, canvassed that the petitioner had income and its source was in his special
knowledge which he had not disclosed, so the trial court was justified in passing the order of maintenance in
favor of the respondent.
9. Section 24 of the Hindu Marriage Act provides establishment of two essential conditions to enable the court
to pass an order of pendentilite maintenance and award the expenses of the proceeding in favor of the husband
or wife. These are that the husband or wife does not have independent income to support him/her and that the
interim maintenance and the expenses of the proceedings are to be fixed having regard to the income of both
the spouses. In the divorce petition the respondent wife has indeed alleged that the petitioner husband is not
running any business. His factory has closed down. The bank from which loan was taken for the factory had
started proceeding for its recovery before the Debt Recovery Tribunal. The money has not been paid. It is
further alleged by her that the petitioner had stopped giving her money for meeting the household expenses
since 1994. The petitioner, however, in his reply has submitted that he did not have income since 1998.
Certain more facts are worth noticing. The petitioner husband belonged to a very rich family of Delhi. He
owns ancestral property in Old Delhi and also owned a big house in Friends Colony East. Anyhow owning
property itself will not make the petitioner saddle him with the liability to pay the maintenance under Section
24. The petitioner would be liable to pay if he has income. The word "income" used in this Section 24 of the
Act is of widest amplitude. The income may be in cash or kind but it has to be an accrual from the movable or
immovable assets. It will definitely not include the immovable or movable property itself. For instance the
wages, salary, interest or dividend, agricultural produce of a land, the fruits from fruit bearing tree or orchard,
the rent from the house etc will be income. Section 24 uses the word "income" juxtaposed the words 'income
and property' used in Section 25 of the Act. The income and the property or capital assets, as such, are not one
and the same thing. A spouse may own huge immovable properties of immense value but if there is no yield
or accrual of interest or rent they would not be reckoned for calculating the amount of maintenance. But if the
spouse has money in its hand may be by the sale proceeds of any immovable or movable property which he or
she is using for meeting the personal expenses or the expenses of the household then that could certainly be
taken into account. Shares or bonds may not be included in the term income but what was yielded in the shape
of dividend or interest would become income. This view finds support from the judgment of the Calcutta High
Court in Gita Chatterjee Vs. Probhat Kumar Chatterjee, and Kerala High Court in Hema Vs. S. Lakshmana
Bhat, .
10. In the backdrop of the above proposition of law now I may proceed to consider as to whether the
petitioner and the respondent had income. The trial court had repelled the contention of the petitioner husband
that the respondent wife is a earning hand or has some source of her income on which she is allegedly
sustaining her luxurious life, her car, credit card or cellphone etc. In fact apart from making a hollow
allegation that the respondent wife owned a Honda City car, a cellphone or a credit card he has not been able
to bring forth any tangible proof to substantiate his allegation barring that in the year 1998 she had worked in
the concern of her father and had earned income for which she had submitted an income tax return. There is
no allegation or proof that before that or after that year she had submitted the return. There is no proof that she
was maintaining a car or had a cellphone or the credit card which she is using. It is also not denied that her
father is living in a rented flat and the respondent is presently staying with him there. It is also not denied that
her father was running some consultancy work in Hyderabad before shifting to Delhi and that he was running
some business here as well. The oral allegation of the petitioner that the respondent is having source of
income to enable her to sustain and support herself, therefore, had no proof. The contention of the petitioner
husband was rightly rejected by the trial court.
11. Adverting to the income of the petitioner husband, as stated above, the respondent wife had made
allegation in the divorce petition that after the failure of the business in 1994 the petitioner husband was not
earning but was sustaining himself by selling the immovable properties. The petitioner husband has himself
stated that he belonged to a very rich and affluent family. He had not denied that his family owned large
immovable property and houses. It is also not disputed that his father had given him a built up house which he
says is standing on a large piece of land in New Friends Colony East. Disposal of the properties by him for
meeting the expenses has not been denied. It is also not denied that he was member of Gymkhana club though
alleged that he had become its member 30 years back and still owed a sum of Rs. 6000 to the club. He did not
deny that he was also member of Noida Golf club. According to him his son has now started residing with
him and he was spending Rs. 3000 on his school fees and another sum of Rs. 5500/- on his other expenses. He
also says that he was maintaining the household expenses of Rs. 12000 per month by borrowing money from
his mother and other friends. He has a telephone. According to the petitioner since 1998 he did not have
income and that he was only dependent upon his mother but he did not disclose as to whether he had received
his share from the sale of any of the ancestral properties or the sale of the land to Unitech Builders or the sale
of the annexe building in New Friends Colony by his mother. He has also not disclosed the names of his
friends and relatives from whom he had borrowed the money. Nor did he disclose the amount which his
mother is spending upon him. It may also be remembered that the petitioner and his son are living in a
separate house and they are not living with the mother. How the petitioner is meeting the household expenses
and other expenses and maintenance of his son was also in his special knowledge and he should have
disclosed it. When the petitioner has not truthfully come out with all this information the trial court was
perfectly justified in making some guess and estimate about the money which he has and that he has some
latent source of income which during these hard days are sustaining him, the lifestyle to which he was
accustomed or a little less than that. But his living standard is not reflective of any financial strain on him.
12. In terms of Section 24 of the Act the maintenance of the applicant spouse whether he is a husband or a
wife is to be fixed on a sum which seems to be reasonable. There is no infirmity in the finding of the learned
trial court that the respondent wife does not have independent source of income for her support. Conversely
his finding that the petitioner husband had some source of income which he has not disclosed can also not be
discarded since it is based on sound principles of law in the facts and circumstances of the case.
13. According to the case of the petitioner he was accustomed to pass a life of luxury. He was paying Rs.
50,000 to the respondent wife for meeting the household expenses, she was also using credit card provided by
him and was spending up to Rs. 30,000 per moth. He was spending thousands rather lakhs of rupees on her
medical treatment and surgery. The petitioner says that he now does not live the style of his former life but the
respondent wife is also entitled to live to the standard of life which the petitioner is now leading.
14. Having regard to the above discussion and the facts and circumstances of the case I do not find any
jurisdictional error or any material irregularity in the exercise of the jurisdiction by the trial court when it
fixed the interim maintenance of the respondent wife at Rs. 12,000 per month and her expenses at Rs. 10,000.
The amount of pendentilite interest fixed by the trial court is reasonable. In the totality of the facts and
circumstances of the case I do not find any merit in the petition. It is dismissed leaving the parties to bear their
own cost.

T. Kalaiselvan, Advocate (Advocate)     29 September 2013

If you can prove that you have taken action to bring her back into the matrimonial fold and that she refuses to return without any valid reason and sufficient ground, her refusal will be a valid ground to reject her petition

AjayKumarSharma (Anon)     29 September 2013

Thanks you Mr. Kalaselvan. What's the acceptability of audio recordings in courts of India and what's the proper way to present that as evidence?


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