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Hoc anno

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "this year"
Explanation: A phrase used to describe the current year or the year being discussed in a specific context.
Usage in a sentence: I have to get a job hoc anno.

Hoc loco

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "in this place","at this point"
Explanation: A phrase used to denote a specific point or a place in a discussion or narrative. 
Usage in a sentence: I can’t differentiate between this and that hoc loco.

Hoc tempore

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "at this time"
Explanation: A phrase that is used to refer to the current moment or period.
Usage in a sentence: I have no idea what to do hoc tempore.

Hodie mihi, cras tibi

Origination: A phrase that has its origins in ancient Roman culture and literature.
Meaning: "today it's me, tomorrow it will be you"
Explanation: A phrase that can be seen as an inscription on tombstone dating the Middle Ages, referring to the temporary nature of life"
Usage in a sentence: After being teased for falling down a sinkhole, Jacob reminded everyone hodie mihi, cras tibi.

In curia

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "in court", "in a court of law"
Explanation: A Classical Latin phrase that is used to refer to a court of law or a judicial office.
Usage in a sentence: I will meet you in curia.

Lapsus linguae

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "a slip of the tongue"
Explanation: A phrase used to refer to an unintentional error in speaking, where someone says something different to what was intended.
Usage in a sentence: Rahul made a lapsus linguae during the presentation and accidentally mispronounced the director’s name.

Lex non scripta

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "law not written", "unwritten law"
Explanation: A phrase referring to legal principles that are not formally codified in written statutes or laws and are instead based on a custom, tradition, or common understanding.
Usage in a sentence: In some countries, lex non scripta plays a crucial role in maintaining the harmony of that nation.

Lex loci

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "law of the place"
Explanation: A phrase used to denote that the” laws applicable in a particular legal situation are determined by the jurisdiction where the problem occurred.
Usage in a sentence: The court applied the principle of lex loci to determine whether it had jurisdiction in the case.

Lex scripta

Origination: A phrase of late Latin origin, particularly in the field of law.
Meaning: "the written law", "the statute law"
Explanation: A phrase that is used to refer to laws that have already been formally codified and recorded in written statutes.
Usage in a sentence: The case was interpreted using the principle of lex scripta.

Lex talionis

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "the law of retaliation", "the law of revenge"
Explanation: A phrase that is used to refer to the principle of “an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth”.
Usage in a sentence: Hammurabi's code was based on the maxim of lex talionis.

Noli me tangere

Origination: A phrase that originates from the Bible (Gospel of John 20:17)
Meaning: "do not touch me”, “do not interfere in my matters"
Explanation: A phrase that originated from the Bible where Jesus says to Mary Magdalene after his resurrection a phrase that means “Touch me not, for I am not yet ascended to my father”. It has since been used to metaphorically mean “do not touch me”.
Usage in a sentence: The behavior of the cat after going to the vet reminded me of the phrase noli me tangere.

Nunc est bibendum

Origination: A phrase that originated from one of the poems of the Roman poet Horace.
Meaning: “now is the time to drink”, “let us drink now”
Explanation: A phrase that is used to express a celebratory or festive mood, suggesting that it is time to enjoy oneself and indulge in some celebration that often involves drinking.
Usage in a sentence: After successfully completing the project, Aaron screamed nunc est bibendum!

Omnia vincit amor

Origination: A phrase of Latin Origin.
Meaning: "love conquers all"
Explanation: A phrase that is often used to signify that love is powerful and can overcome any obstacle or challenge.
Usage in a sentence: Aaron and Prakriti believed in the principle of omnia vincit amor.

On dit

Origination: A phrase of French origin that has been in use for centuries.
Meaning: “the flying rumor”, “it is said”
Explanation: A phrase used to introduce something that is rumored or commonly believed.
Usage in a sentence: On dit she is the best artist in town.

Onus probandi

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: “burden of proof”
Explanation: A phrase that refers to the obligation or responsibility that is placed on a party in a suit to provide evidence to prove their claims.
Usage in a sentence: The Court reminded the defendant that the onus probandi was on them to prove their claim.

Post mortem

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: “after death”
Explanation: A phrase that is used commonly both in medicine and law that used to refer to events or examinations that occur after someone has died.
Usage in a sentence: The post mortem was conducted after obtaining permission from the deceased’s family.

Post obitum

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "after death", "after one's decease"
Explanation: A phrase that is used to refer to events that occur following someone’s death.
Usage in a sentence: The terms of the will specified how the property should be managed post obitum.

Proces verbal

Origination: A phrase of French origin.
Meaning: "a written statement", "official record"
Explanation: A phrase that is used to refer to a written record of a procedure or event. Commonly used in legal and administrative contexts to document the details of the matters discussed in a meeting.
Usage in a sentence: Rahul mailed the proces verbal to his boss after the meeting.

Pro memoria

Origination: A phrase of Latin origin.
Meaning: "for memory", "as a reminder"
Explanation: A phrase used to refer to a note made to help remember something, often in diplomatic discussions.
Usage in a sentence: The pro memoria of the meeting was made by the secretary so that the important points were not forgotten.

Edited and modified by Aadil


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