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A PECULIAR STORY 

In an unusual event, the Jain community in Delhi pooled together Rs 1.5 million, purchasing 124 goats to prevent their sacrifice during Bakrid, a significant Muslim festival on June 17. As reported, Vivek Jain, a 30-year-old chartered accountant, devised this initiative and has housed the rescued goats in a temple located in Chandni Chowk, Delhi. 

This act was not part of a religious conversion or cultural exploration; rather, it was a strategic move to save these animals from being sacrificed during the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha.

THE ACT OF DISGUISE 

Chirag Jain, involved in the incident, informed that their guru Sanjeev was deeply troubled by the prospect of goats being sacrificed during Bakri Eid and was motivated to take action. On June 15, a group of 25 individuals disguised themselves as Muslims and visited markets in old Delhi such as Jama Masjid and Meena Bazar.

According to Vivek Jain's account, they posed as Muslims to avoid paying inflated prices, successfully negotiating to purchase all the goats at an average cost of Rs 10,000 each. These rescued goats were then transported to the Naya Jain Mandir in the Dharampur area for safekeeping.

Jain mantras were played in speakers in order to calm down the frenzied goats who were anxious because they perceive themselves as being gathered for slaughter. Unaware to themselves they were given a new lease of life.

CASE OF IMPERSONATION? 

  • Impersonation under IPC is described as- a person is said to “cheat by personation” if he cheats by pretending to be some other person, or by knowingly substituting one person for another, or representing that he or any other person is a person other than he or such other person really is.
  • However, this case may not qualify as a case of impersonation as the intent was not to defraud or cause harm.

RELIGIOUS FREEDOM VS ANIMAL RIGHT                                               

India’s constitution guarantees religious freedom, allowing diverse practices, including animal sacrifice. Simultaneously, there are animal welfare laws that protect against cruelty. This incident sits at the crossroads of these two legal realms, challenging the boundaries of religious rites and animal rights.

Bakri Eid is an important Muslim festival centred around the ritual sacrifice of goats.

On several occasions, certain events have sparked debates on animal rights and drawn criticism towards particular customs. PETA, an organization committed to animal welfare, proposed that Muslims consider vegan options instead of sacrificing animals during the festival.
 

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