Big Data Revolution In The Supreme Court

Key Takeaways

● The Supreme Court's Portal for Assistance in Court Efficiency (SUPACE) was launched last month

● SUVAAS, an indigenously designed neural translation software was launched in November 2019

● These tools can be useful for gathering knowledge and feedback from courtroom procedures, and they will assist with case administration and planning.

● Chief Justice S.A. Bobde, who introduced Artificial Intelligence to the Supreme Court of India and is widely regarded as the founder of this movement in the Indian judiciary.

● Artificial intelligence (AI) does not, under any conditions, replace human beings.

● Big Data is playing an increasingly important role in undermining the legal industry.

Introduction

This decade will be a watershed moment for the Indian judiciary because it will usher in a new era of greater technical integration. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the Supreme Court, in particular, has performed admirably. Digital courtroom trials, which have been in use since March 2020, have changed the way we think of lawsuits and courts. What was once thought to be impossible has now become the only way to get justice in India's courts.

The Supreme Court's Artificial Intelligence Committee has been working on incorporating subtle and clever advanced sciences into the courtroom. The Supreme Court's Portal for Assistance in Court Efficiency (SUPACE) was launched last month, marking a landmark moment in the Indian judiciary's ongoing AI experimentation.

The Apex Court had previously unveiled SUVAAS, an indigenously designed neural translation software, in November 2019. It appears that India's time for a futuristic judiciary has arrived, and the Supreme Court is on its way to cashing in on what is currently the world's most valuable currency, Big Data.


What Is Big Data

Every day, those of us who use the internet generate, create two and a half quintillion bytes of data. According to International Data Corporation, this is expected to grow by 50% a year or more, doubling every two years.

The time frame The term "big data" refers to extremely large data sets. These are information units with dimensions on the order of exabytes. To put it in perspective, an exabyte is 1,000,000 terabytes.

Large amounts of data may be gathered from any region that is ready to be digitized. This “data flood” that is sweeping our economies, businesses, academics, and the government is gathered in massive quantities and tamed and analyzed using computer and mathematical models for trends and characteristics, which in turn provide useful insights. Because of the valuable information that data analysis provides, data is being viewed as a new type of financial asset, similar to forex, gold, or oil.

In turn, the abundance of current knowledge has accelerated further advancements in computing. Synthetic intelligence techniques such as natural language processing, sample recognition, and machine learning are at the forefront. Since its establishment, the Indian judicial system has been heavily reliant on books and paperwork. Thousands of cases are filed each year in Indian courts, and the number is only increasing.

Each case necessitates the constant monitoring of information such as jurisdiction, decisions, precedents, legal interpretations, witness statements, courtroom logs, and so on. The eventual digitization of paperwork required for digital court proceedings has already resulted in the development of an unending treasure trove of unstructured data. The Supreme Court has improved its ability to collect and process large amounts of data with new tools like SUPACE and SUVAS.

In the long run, these tools can be useful for gathering knowledge and feedback from courtroom procedures, and they will assist with case administration and planning.


What Is SUPACE And SUVAAS

SUPACE can determine and extract various target information from the file, such as the date, period, and location of the occurrence. It will ask immediate questions and provide answers to the case's problems. It enables the user to complete all of the relevant tasks that are typically completed in a fragmented manner in any phrase processing software program.

SUVAAS translates judgments and other legal documents from English into nine vernacular dialects and vice versa.

SUVAAS and SUPACE announce the foundational AI technology for the Indian justice system.

These instruments can, over time, be useful in easing the mundane administrative tasks that currently encumber judges.

They would significantly decrease the number of time judges spends researching and applying case precedents, giving them more time to focus on their judicial responsibilities.

Chief Justice S.A. Bobde, who introduced Artificial Intelligence to the Supreme Court of India and is widely regarded as the founder of this movement in the Indian judiciary.

For example, if a judge wants to know if the accused's blood group matches the victim's blood group. He would almost certainly discover this for himself by turning the pages of the paper book, which will take some time. The AI could obtain this information in a matter of seconds and could also show the claims made in each of the courts as well as the conclusions of each court at the same time.

Much depends on how often AI is used and how it is trained, to use the technical term. AI will not create any post-production redundancy at any stage.

For example, the all-too-important and routine task of entering data into a large register with several columns can be performed by AI with astonishing speed and precision, which would be impossible for a human to achieve. And with a high level of continuity, with no mistakes.

Future Of Lawyers

Lawyers and law firms deal with massive amounts of information in the form of books and paperwork. Attorneys derive their inputs for advising clients from knowledge gleaned over time from their personal experience with education legislation. This knowledge is in the form of unstructured data, and the evaluation and observations it offers are the product of a lawyer's mind that has been trained over time in the process of a case.

In India, we are still in the early stages of big data and analytics, and there is still a lot of misunderstanding about what big data and data analytics are. But, if we think about it for a second, it becomes clear that legal procedure revolves around massive amounts of ever-increasing data.

As a result, lawyers believe that their personal experience and judgment are so subjective that a computer program will never do its job. This is essentially what we erroneously believe Artificial Intelligence to mean.

Artificial intelligence (AI) does not, under any conditions, replace human beings. Instead, they have a means of removing the rote and mundane tasks from a lawyer's work. Manually distilling outdated or obsolete information from the knowledge that should be preserved for the case from large quantities of knowledge, for example, may take weeks, months, or even years. This can be done in a matter of seconds using computational instruments that are aided by large amounts of data.


Conclusion

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing are only some of the tools at a lawyer's disposal to help them improve their experience, judgment, and decision-making process. Tools that offer insights and links to their clients that may not be as obvious if they didn't have access to data analytics and data expertise.

Large amounts of information aren't valuable in and of themselves. Only when data is mined and analyzed into similar information, and then crystallized from information into perception, does it become valuable? It is interpretation extracted from data that really transforms data into something meaningful.

Big Data is playing an increasingly important role in undermining the legal industry's business. These businesses are already advancing thanks to the use of laptop instruments that are fueled by large amounts of data. Perhaps now is the time for the legal profession to be aware of the implementation of computing instruments in Indian courts.

 

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