Displaying 1 - 10 of 14 in 2 pages
T V Krishnamurthy
Wrote on 13 March 2016  

As a common man I would like to know following 1. Did Supreme Court NOT ammend the constitution when it ruled to set up Collegium for appointment of judges? 2. If SC did ammend the constitution, is the ammendment valid? To me this is the issue that needs to be answered by SC.


k.v.sreenivasan
Wrote on 02 February 2016  

In ordinary sense the honble Courts of SC & HC are giving judgements like the Court dot wants to interefear in the Government administration if we file labour cases. If so how the honble court should stay the appointmnet of NJAC Act which is has been duly passed the Central Government with mojotiry vote of 172 in Rajaya Shabha and Lok shabha. As per our Consitution whether the Parliament is empowered fo pass a new law or amended it or the Court is having power .The courts are only administrator of law not a law making authroity as per our Consitution.


k.v.sreenivasan
Wrote on 02 December 2015  

Even the basic tanets f Federalism is suremach of Judiciary. Now a days as correctly pointed out by Ex law Minister mr. Shanthi Bushan has stated Dhaanjay Mahapha TNN Sept 17 /2010, that eight CJI wer corrupt amont the list of 16 prepered by him. This can be proved if we comapre the dispoportions of assets & wealth of those judges that their known souces of slaray income of rs 90000 per month + DA and other allowances in total shall not exceed Rs 2.5 lakhs per month.


Chirag Pandya
Wrote on 01 December 2015  

Parliament as well as Judiciary both are the custodian of the Indian Constitution. One of the basic tanets of Federalism is supremacy of Judiciary. No one shall allowed to encroach one's own sphere. Appointment and existance of official of one wing shall not be solely in the control and sweetwill of that of the other wing. That is absolute division of power which is another tenet of Federal Constitution.


Chirag Pandya
Wrote on 01 December 2015  

Not only Judiciary but Parliament as well as Judiciary both are the custodian of the Indian Constitution. One of the basic tanets of Federalism is supremacy of Judiciary. No one shall allowed to encroach one's own sphere. Appointment and existance of official of one wing shall not be solely in the control and sweetwill of that of the other wing. That is absolute division of power which is another tenet of Federal Constitution.


Chirag Pandya
Wrote on 01 December 2015  

Not only Judiciary but Parliament as well as Judiciary both are the custodian of the Indian Constitution. One of the basic tanets of Federalism is supremacy of Judiciary. No one shall allowed to encroach one's own sphere. Appointment and existance of official of one wing shall not be solely in the control and sweetwill of that of the other wing. That is absolute division of power which is another tenet of Federal Constitution.


uphar upadhyaya
Wrote on 29 November 2015  

ye kshertadhikar judges and advocates me se hi utpann hai kyoki they are the only experts in this field....bhale hi vidhayika kanoon banaye per unko vyakhyayit to nyayalay hk karta hai..


uphar upadhyaya
Wrote on 29 November 2015  

karyapalika ko nyay palika se prathak hi hona chaiye ...article 50 of dpsp ki mansha bhi ye hi hai...


DHARMENDRASINH RANA
Wrote on 04 November 2015  

How be stretch of imagination basic structure rule applied and SC has utilised its writ jurisdiction as Art 50 contains in directive principles of State. statute which is enacted by parliament and accepted by moreover 20 s states council is struct down by few appointed people who are seeming protectors of constitution..!


A.A.JOSE BARODA
Wrote on 21 October 2015  

Who wants to part with their powers ? Only consolation is that atleast some of the Counsel have boldly pointed out where the collegium systems and the judiciary failed !


You need to be logged in to post comment





×

  LAWyersclubindia Menu

web analytics