K Rajasekharan
13 December 2019 at 11:20
In Reply To :

Sanad

You can apply to the bar council in your state for enrolling as an advocate, about which details would be available on the bar council site.

Apply for enrollment along with the prescribed fee, attend the enrollment function on the designated day, and you will be an advocate with the right to practice in a court of law.

K Rajasekharan
13 December 2019 at 11:03
In Reply To :

No interm order

The parties or counsels cannot ask or moot the court to deliver an order at a particular time.

When to decide an issue or deliver an order is the prerogative of the court and that depends on many factors.

However, prudent and systematic counsels will do whatever they can in such a quite messy court system to speed up the case.

If luck favours it will work in their favour. Otherwise you have to keep your faith in your destiny.

K Rajasekharan
13 December 2019 at 10:46
In Reply To :

Without inform me my father gave a settlement the property t

Other learned expert has clearly and rightly answered the query already.

As he says you have absolutely no claim in the property.

Any person, including a father like yours, has absolute authority to legally dispense of his property, if it is self acquired, in whatever ways he likes, without consulting or informing anyone, including his children or family members.

The legal heirs have legal claim only in ancestral property which is almost not in existence nowadays, except in rare cases in many parts of the country.




Anonymous
13 December 2019 at 10:40

Declaration and permanent injunction

Plaintiff decreed law full co-sharer and granted permanent injunction restrain defendant. Decree date 22/01/2006 but plaintiff till date not execute the decree, scheduled land under possession in defendant (purchased land) 1995 to till date. And decree holders are dies 2008. All revenue documents in name of defendant. Any limitation period for execution of decree.


Anonymous
13 December 2019 at 10:37

Sanad

Hi....
I cleared my exams in 1995-1996.

But due to some reason I wont took sanad for practise. Now I want to get it.
Please let me know how n where shall I get it.


 



 

Sudhir Kumar
13 December 2019 at 08:53
In Reply To :

Registration of marriage with so much complications

FIRST MARRIAGE IS VALID REST ARE ALL DRAMA.

Sudhir Kumar
13 December 2019 at 08:52
In Reply To :

Marriage under special marriage act

NO

Sudhir Kumar
13 December 2019 at 08:51
In Reply To :

Unmarried sister harshment

".according to muslim law it is possible."

YES

Sudhir Kumar
13 December 2019 at 08:51
In Reply To :

Unmarried sister harshment

"can she file partition suit with the help of my mother and another sister(married)"

YES SHE CAN FILE EVEN WITHOUT THEIR HELP[

Sudhir Kumar
13 December 2019 at 08:49
In Reply To :

Without inform me my father gave a settlement the property t

You have no claim

J K Agrawal
13 December 2019 at 07:53
In Reply To :

Son right on fathers property in muslim

Thanks to Mr Karma for a detailed reply.
Generally a father can gift his self acquired property to any body and that is valid. (however Muslim Law contains some condition upon gift and its validation so it is required copy of deed for better advise.)
After gift, your sister can claim share in house,
You as well She can file a suit for this.
In General you will get 1/2 of the property and 1/4 your sister and 1/4 your mother but is is not an absolute advise. There are so many ifs and buts. A proper advise possible by looking at your entire family background and the sect you profess under muslims.

Sb Karma
13 December 2019 at 07:04
In Reply To :

No interm order

There may be facts and cause which vary to your case.....without knowing those facts its not perfect to reply you.
I will suggest you to appoint local prudent lawyer who will assist you best.Via online it's n ot possible to help you best

ganesh
13 December 2019 at 07:00
In Reply To :

Options available to set aside ex-parte evidence

Thank you for your reply Raj Kumar Makkad Ji. Exparte set on 28 nov 2019 and posted for exparte evidence on 19 12 2019. No exparte order so far. i request information on how to restore CMP originial state where in adjournments have been done for counter by respondent for my CMP. i apprehend missing of legal process that when CMP on trial for want of counter by respondent how is it possible to take main petition for trail because of CMP petitioner absent on the adjourned date. I , cmp petitioner is not in default as it was for cmp respondent to file counter then. please guide on if there any procedural lapse which i can apply for setting aside ex-parte that was set.

Sb Karma
13 December 2019 at 07:00
In Reply To :

Without inform me my father gave a settlement the property t

Property for daughter can be defined as follow----But I will suggest Please consult a local lawyer who will assist you best,may be he may find loop holes which may benefit you......

1. If property is ancestral
Under the Hindu law, property is divided into two types: ancestral and self-acquired. Ancestral property is defined as one that is inherited up to four generations of male lineage and should have remained undivided throughout this period. For descendants, be it a daughter or son, an equal share in such a property accrues by birth itself. Before 2005, only sons had a share in such property. So, by law, a father cannot will such property to anyone he wants to, or deprive a daughter of her share in it. By birth, a daughter has a share in the ancestral property.


2. If property has been self-acquired by father
In the case of a self-acquired property, that is, where a father has bought a piece of land or house with his own money, a daughter is on weaker ground. The father, in this case, has the right to gift the property or will it to anyone he wants, and a daughter will not be able to raise an objection.

3. If father dies intestate
If the father dies intestate, that is, without leaving a will, all legal heirs have an equal right to the property. The Hindu Succession Act categorises a male’s heirs into four classes and the inheritable property goes first to Class I heirs. These include the widow, daughters and sons, among others. Each heir is entitled to one part of the property, which means that as a daughter you have a right to a share in your father’s property.

4. If daughter is married
Before 2005, the Hindu Succession Act considered daughters only as members of the Hindu Undivided Family (HUF), not coparceners. The latter are the lineal descendants of a common ancestor, with the first four generations having a birth right to ancestral or self-acquired property. However, once the daughter was married, she was no longer considered a member of the HUF. After the 2005 amendment, the daughter has been recognised as a corparcener and her marital status makes no difference to her right over the father’s property.

5. If daughter was born or father died before 2005
It does not matter if the daughter was born before or after 9 September 2005, when the amendment to the Act was carried out. She will have the same rights as a son to the father’s property, be it ancestral or self-acquired, irrespective of her date of birth. On the other hand, the father has to have been alive on 9 September 2005 for the daughter to stake a claim over his property. If he had died before 2005, she will have no right over the ancestral property, and self-acquired property will be distributed as per the father’s will.



Akash
13 December 2019 at 00:19
In Reply To :

Partnership issue

Later I got the copy of 1987 IT returns copy.
So I msged for expert adv6










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